Top 5 Considerations for a Horse Sale Agreement with a Trial Period

If you are thinking about buying or selling a horse on a “trial basis”, or if you are entering into a horse sale agreement with a trial period, here are five of the most important things you should consider:

1)      The Timing of the Pre-Purchase Exam.  The most important consideration in horse sales is usually, “is the horse sound”?  If the horse is not sound enough to perform the intended tasks of the prospective buyer, the prospective buyer shouldn’t be taking it “on trial” anyway.  It doesn’t happen often, but a horse can sustain an injury or get sick during even a short trial period.  Therefore, the pre-purchase exam should be conducted before the horse is ever taken by a prospective buyer to “try out.”  If a question is ever raised as to whose possession the horse was in when the horse was injured or got sick, both parties will be informed of the horse’s condition when it left the seller’s property if the pre-purchase exam is conducted before the horse leaves.  See the following posts for more information on the types of tests that should be conducted in a pre-purchase exam.

Guest Post:  Top 10 Pre-Purchase Exam Considerations

Tips for Equine Pre-Purchase Exams

2)      Insurance.  If the horse is nice / expensive, the seller should insure it for mortality and major medical before the prospective buyer leaves with the horse.  Note:  Sellers should speak with their insurance agent to make sure the seller’s insurance will cover incidents that occur during the trial period.  If the seller’s insurance will not cover the trial period, good equine insurance agents can often sell the prospective buyer a short-term insurance “binder” that will cover incidents that occur during the trial period.  These short-term "binders" may be extended by a formal policy if the prospective purchaser decides to keep the horse.  If the prospective buyer purchases an insurance “binder”, the seller should be named as additional insured.

3)      Written Purchase & Sale Agreement.  All terms of a purchase agreement “on trial” should be reduced to writing.  Among other things, the specific term of the trial period should be set out, as well as who will bear the risk if the horse is injured or dies during the trial period.  A “security deposit” can also be provided for in the agreement, along with specifics on when the seller can keep the deposit and in which instances the deposit will be refunded to the prospective buyer.  The bill of sale (which transfers title to the horse) and the registration papers should not be signed over until after the trial period has expired. 

4)      Liability Release.  The seller should consider having the prospective buyer sign a release of liability should the prospective buyer or its property be damaged during the trial period.  This will not cover injury to third parties in most instances.  A seller can procure a liability insurance policy to cover accidents involving the horse and third parties.

5)      Location of Horse During Trial Period.  A seller should have a prospective buyer agree in writing as to a single location where the horse will be kept during the trial period.  The seller can deliver the horse to said location or make other arrangements to either approve or disapprove the living conditions of the horse before the horse is released to the prospective buyer.  If the prospective buyer intends to board the horse with a third-party, it is wise for sellers to make sure that the prospective buyer pre-pays board for the trial period in advance.  This is to guard against stableman’s or agister’s liens being placed on the horse if the prospective buyer does not pay board during the trial period.

Due to all of these concerns (and others), I do not typically recommend that prospective buyers or sellers enter into "trial period" sale agreements.  In the best case scenario, a seller would allow a prospective buyer to inspect the horse as much as needed prior to the sale, either 1) on the seller's premises;  or 2) at some other venue to which the seller would transport the horse for purposes of inspection.

This post was in response to a special request I received from a reader for a blog post on horse sales with trial periods.  I’m kind of like one of those music groups that takes requests as long as the song is in their repertoire, and I don’t even ask for tips in return!  So please contact me if you have any special requests for a blog topic.  I’m always looking for good content that will be helpful to my readers.

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Comments (3) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Paul Hulsebusch - January 19, 2012 11:31 AM

Allison, as always great stuff!!!! When it comes to Insurance the key is to make sure there is an Insurable Interest for the party purchasing the coverage and all terms are fully disclosed. We write a lot of these short term policies and really try hard to keep the insurable interest tied to the coverage, sometimes borrowing/leasing can be confusing... Keep up the great work!!

David H - January 19, 2012 12:24 PM

Good stuff Alison. Thanks for the post!

Q: Would a short-term lease to purchase agreement be easier?

Seems better from a Buyer's side anyway in that they don't have to get committed to a horse they are not sure is a good fit for rider and/or purpose.

The Seller could just pass off insurance cost to Lessee in the lease price. They could even require the horse stay on their premises if the two parties are local.

As an owner/seller myself, all bets would be off if the Buyer is not local, and I couldn't check in on the horse.

Alison Rowe - January 19, 2012 1:32 PM

Paul, glad you liked the post!

David H--a short-term lease during which the buyer would 'try out' the horse would be easier and present fewer problems for both parties, but only if the horse stayed on the seller's premises during the lease term. Even if the horse stayed with the seller during the lease, the first 4 issues discussed in this post would still need to be dealt with.

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