March 2009

In these economic times, horse industry businesses need to make sure they are effectively managing their credit, as well as their client relationships.

Many equine-related businesses owners have occasion to extend credit to their customers or clients. First of all, it is important to get everyone on the same page with respect to billing. “Everyone” includes you, others in your office who have client contact, and the client. For example, everyone who deals with your accounts should know when statements are mailed, when payment is due, and when or if the client may spread out payment over a number of installments. Similarly, your customer or client needs to clearly understand your expectations regarding payment. 

Your spoken words and your actions must match your paperwork and billing terms. This is one of the weakest areas for many horse businesses in debt management. I have seen, for example, many people who believe someone is boarding or training their horse for free in exchange for a commission when the horse is sold, only to receive a bill in the mail months later for thousands of dollars of boarding and training services. When this occurs, there is a much higher potential to really upset a client who believes your rules have changed between what was verbally offered and how they were actually billed. 

The following are some things you can do to avoid having to collect a debt in the first place:

1. Have clear, written terms from the outset.  You need to give your client a written confirmation of the product or service you will be providing before you provide the product or service.   The initial agreement should be signed by both you and the client.  

2. Publish your terms frequently.  Your terms should be published frequently after the original agreement. For example, the payment due date should be printed on each statement.

3. Send out detailed statements.  You should bill your clients at least once per month, and the bill needs to be as detailed as possible. People are more likely to pay a bill and pay it on time when they fully understand all the services that were performed. When a client sees a general entry such as “vet services” on a bill, for instance, when the client had no idea a veterinarian had treated their horse, the client may become suspicious that you are divvying up your vet expenses equally among all clients, whether that particular client received the vet service or not. 

4. Invoice clients on a consistent billing cycle.  Once a product or service has been delivered, invoice the client as soon as possible. Whichever date you choose to send out bills, send one out at least once per month on that same schedule as long as you are providing services or waiting for payment.

5. Encourage prompt payment.  To encourage the prompt settlement of bills, offer an incentive such as discounts for early payments (while always balancing the extent of the price cut with the benefits of an improved cash flow).

For more debt collection tips, continue reading.

Continue Reading How to Successfully Manage Credit in a Tough Economy

Profit-sharing arrangements between a horse owner and his or her trainer are commonplace in the horse industry. They are often referred to as “partnerships,” but a written contract is seldom used. I strongly advise my clients against doing any kind of profit-sharing or partnership arrangement without putting the terms in writingI have seen countless relationships between owners and trainers break down over a profit-sharing deal, and it generally happens because the parties had a different idea about what the agreement was supposed to entail. These disputes can get ugly, and sometimes law enforcement even becomes involved in disputes over possession of the horse. 

Usual Scenario. The typical profit-sharing arrangement usually arises when the owner and trainer agree that the trainer will train, board, and promote the horse free of charge or at a very discounted rate to the owner in exchange for an increased percentage of the horse’s racing proceeds or a percentage of the proceeds from selling or breeding the horse.

 

Essential Documents. The following documents should be drafted to fit your specific terms and executed by the appropriated parties:

 

* A purchase and sale agreement between the owner and seller;

* A bill of sale transferring title of the horse from the seller to the owner; and

* A profit-sharing agreement between the trainer and owner.

Continue Reading Legal Documentation for Owner / Trainer Profit Sharing Deals