The latest case featuring ClassicStar and GeoStar’s mare-leasing scheme featured the defendants leasing out mares they didn’t own and leasing less-valuable quarter horses and misrepresenting them to be Thoroughbred mares. On July 18, 2013, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a $65 million award to victims of the scheme. In re ClassicStar Mare Lease Litig., — F.3d —, 2013 WL 3476220 (6thCir. July 18, 2013). Guest blogger B. Paul Husband wrote about ClassicStar’s litigation with the IRS in 2011.

In the recent case, a group of investors sued the ClassicStar defendants in federal district court in Kentucky. They alleged that the defendants had violated the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (“RICO”) by persuading them to invest in the mare-leasing program in order to profit from various tax deductions. They also asserted common-law fraud and breach-of-contract claims.

The basic tax concept was that investors would lease a breeding mare for a single season. The mare would be paired with a stallion for breeding purposes, and investors could keep any resulting foals. If investors kept their foals for at least two years before selling them, the sale would be taxed at the lower capital-gains tax rate.

The district court granted summary judgment for the plaintiffs, ruling that the undisputed facts established violations of the RICO statute, as well as fraud and breach of contract. The Sixth Circuit affirmed, noting that the investors did not know “that the assets which formed the basis of the touted tax deductions were dramatically undervalued and, in some cases, wholly fictitious.” 

The appellate court made the critical point that, “[a]lthough investors were repeatedly told that they were leasing actual horses, ClassicStar never owned anywhere near the number of horses purportedly being leased.” In other words, the defendants leased out horses they didn’t own or that didn’t exist. 

The court continued, “[t]o disguise the shortfall and convince investors that they were purchasing interests in actual horses, Defendants substituted less valuable quarter-horses for the Thoroughbreds that were supposed to be part of the packages, and in many cases, simply did not name the horses that investors believed they were purchasing.”

The Sixth Circuit affirmed the award of $49.4 million plus $15.6 million in prejudgment interest. The damages were three times the amount of the plaintiffs’ investments, as treble damages are available under the RICO statute. Collecting the judgment, however, may be complicated by ClassicStar’s bankruptcy and extensive other litigation against ClassicStar.

About the Author:   Toby Galloway is a partner in the Fort Worth office of Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP.  Before joining Kelly Hart, he served as an attorney for the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") for over 11 years.  Find Toby’s full biography here.

Happy Tuesday!  As of August 15, 2011, we now have a reported tax case arising from the infamous ClassicStar debacle.  Not surprisingly, the precedent involves "bad facts" and is not helpful for other taxpayers who took part in a ClassicStar deal or similar deal.  The following guest post on the opinion, entitled Van Wickler v. Commissioner, is by Paul Husband, a California equine lawyer whose practice emphasizes tax matters.  Enjoy!

"ClassicStar LLC was a company which offered highly leveraged mare leasing deals.  They offered top quality Thoroughbred mares and stallion breeding rights to leading sires like Elusive Quality and Mineshaft. The tax benefits of their programs, turbo-charged with leverage provided by loans which they helped arrange were prodigious. Leveraged mare leasing combined with the expensing of stud fees and the expensing of certain prepaid expenses can generate very significant tax savings. Unfortunately, the principals of this company ended up in prison for fraud.

But the fraud was not based on invalidity of the income tax law principles related to mare leasing and horse breeding which were involved. Rather, the fraud involved misrepresentations concerning  facts of various sorts, such as the “high quality Thoroughbred” mares, who sometimes turned out not to be Thoroughbreds at all, but Quarter Horses, or grade horses. The ClassicStar program also suffered problems in some cases with the reasonableness of charges, such as, a lease fee of over $200,000 which was charged for a mare which sold for $350. 

            There were hundreds of IRS audits of individuals who did business with ClassicStar. There were hundreds of assessments by the IRS based on these audits, and hundreds of Tax Court petitions were filed. Now we have a reported decision.

            The “ClassicStar” case decided August 15, 2011 was entitled Van Wickler v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2011-196; 2011.  It was tried before Tax Court Judge Maurice Foley, a fair-minded judge, who had previously recognized a horseman’s profit motivation in Routon v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo 2002-7 (2002).

            But, horse breeders lose Tax Court cases based on the “hobby loss” rules of Internal Revenue Code Section 183 all the time. Why should we care about this one? We should care because this precedent may be used as a bludgeon against others who did business with ClassicStar, even if the facts of the later cases were very different than the facts in Van Wickler. This reported opinion reflects a conscious policy by the Internal Revenue Service to “manage” case law. The IRS wants case law which is favorable for them. Favorable precedents give IRS Appeals Officers greater leverage in discussing settlements with horse business owning taxpayers and/or their representatives.

            The nature of the facts varies enormously in the hundreds of ClassicStar cases pending across the United States from cases in which the horse leasing taxpayers had very strong facts, and would likely win at trial, to cases such as Van Wickler. The facts in Van Wickler constituted a parade of horribles. In it, the taxpayer:

            1. Signed an agreement purporting to be the managing member of an LLC that had not yet been formed;

            2. Backdated a board agreement to November 1, 2002, when he did not enter into the transaction until December 30, 2002; and

            3. Signed a lease in which the schedule setting forth the names of mares to be leased and stallions whose breeding rights would be used was blank – the taxpayer did not know the identities, or even the breed of the mares which he had allegedly leased.

            The Tax Court in Van Wickler found:

            1. The accountings submitted to the court were contradictory and varied from version to version; and based on them, neither the taxpayer nor the Court could tell how much money was spent, or what it was spent on.

            2. The taxpayer not only did not negotiate the contract terms, he did not even know what the contract terms were.

            3. The taxpayer could not tell what horses had been leased.

            4. The mare named “Lita May” sold for $350, but one chart showed that the lease fee for her was $260,723, and on a different chart, the lease fee for that same mare was shown as $185,000.

            The Court held that there was no basis in the record to determine which expenses were allowable and which were not. Therefore Court concluded that there could not be any expenses allowed as deductions. 

            Yet there was some mercy shown. The Court found that Van Wickler had relied on an independent C.P.A., who had been deceived by the promoters, and who advised Van Wickler that the ClassicStar deal had a high degree of risk, but could have a high return. Based on what the court perceived as good faith efforts to get professional advice and his reliance upon a C.P.A., no penalties were assessed.

           The fact that Van Wickler is a reported case reflects that the IRS is judicious in managing their caseload. It was the Van Wickler case, with terrible facts for the taxpayer, that was tried and reported, rather than a case with good facts for the taxpayer.

            By contrast, in 2009, the IRS had another ClassicStar case in Tax Court which the mares leased were identified and were high quality Thoroughbreds; where the taxpayers were actively involved in managing their business, and had made visits to the farm where the mares were boarded, and to the auctions, had taken extensive horse business education, and had good books and records. The taxpayers had a highly qualified expert witness and your writer as an attorney. In that case, the IRS conceded shortly before trial. It was obvious that they did not wish that case to be the first judicial precedent for ClassicStar breeders.

            Make no mistake, I favor concessions by the IRS when it is obvious to them that the taxpayer is going to win the case. But my point is that as practitioners and horsemen and horsewomen, we should not be overwhelmed when case law like Van Wickler is brandished by an IRS Revenue Agent, Appeals Officer or District Counsel lawyer. They do pick and choose their cases, and therefore, often the judicial opinions come out of cases which are factually favorable for the IRS. These opinions do not mean that cases with facts favorable to the taxpayer/horseperson cannot be won. The individual facts of each case are paramount in determining the outcome of cases such as the ClassicStar cases. Representatives and horsemen should not be cowed into submission by an IRS reference to the Van Wickler decision." 

© B. Paul Husband 2011